It can be really easy to remove a flush clean ejector pump if you have all the tools and the man power needed to do the job. This is definitely not something that you would want to do yourself or even send one of your employees to go do himself. Removing an ejector “flush clean” pump is a bit different then pulling a regular ejector pit pump because a traditional ejector does not have the strainer connected to the pump.Sewage Ejector Pump Installation

Working with any ejector pump can be extremely dangerous because they are incredibly heavy and if not hoisted right they can swing and knock things over, cause property or even injury to the worker(s) that are pulling or installing the pump. Most ejector pumps start at a weight of at least the 250lb to 350lb mark and can get considerably heavier as they increase in discharge size.

The first thing you will want to do is make sure the power is off to the knife switch or breaker that is controlling the ejector pump float switch which is connected to the motor. Make sure when you do this there is a back up pump to handle the sewage or bring a temporary sewage pump with you such as a submersible pump you can drop in and then tie into the line to handle the sewage until the pump is repaired from the pump shop.
Sewage Ejector Pump
Once the power is off and you are sure its off you will want to disconnect the electrical wires from the motor of the pump and make sure to recap them and move the pigtail to a safe place. The pigtail is the piece of wire that is between the float switch and the ejector pump motor. Now that you have removed the wires from the motor you can remove the motor from the top of the ejector pump. After you remove the motor make sure not to loose the spider gasket for the shaft coupling.

You will now want to disconnect the pump discharge line by removing the flange bolt. You may also find it easier to pull the ejector pump if you also remove the check valve as well when you are removing the discharge flange bolts.

Now that you have the pump motor and the wires disconnected you will want to set your tripod and come-a-long up and get it ready to pull the pump from the pit. Make sure that the tripod is stable and the come-a-long is attached well at the top. Make sure to also attach the chains securely to the pump base as well.

With the tripod set, the chains hooked to the pump and the motor removed, you are now ready to open the pump pit hatch and disconnect the stainer from the line. The ejector pump pit will have door and when you climb down the ladder you will find that there will be a stainer that will be piped in line with the pump and this is why they call the pump a flush clean ejector compared to a regular ejector pump. The strainer will be held on by a few bolts that you can remove with your open end wrenches.

Once you have the flush clean stainer disconnected and you climb out of the pump pit you will now have to remove the bolts that hold down the pump collar to the actual ejector pump tank or pit. These bolts are usually around 9/16 – 7/8 depending on what size the flush clean is.

Now that everything is disconnected you can start to winch the come-a-long and start to lift the ejector pump out of the pit. You may have to spin the pump 90 degrees or less to maneuver the pump discharge flange past the discharge line or other lines that may be in the way. Once you have the pump half way up you may have to disconnect the mid section of the pump depending on the length of the ejector. This would require breaking down the flange in the middle and removing the pump shaft at the mid point. If your pump does not have a mid section, simply just skip that part and pull the pump past the tank lip and then set it back down somewhere so it can be carted out of the pump or the mechanical room where it is.

If you are looking to install the flush clean pump, simply just reverse these instructions its as easy as that, and of course if you are not comfortable with this type of work make sure to call a local pump repair company to come and remove the pump for you as they are trained and specialized to do so.